Play #120 – All scoring plays are automatically reviewed by the Command Centre. After review, the Replay Official ruled that WPG #88 (Bailey) used the ground to trap the ball and maintain possession. The ruling on the field is overturned.

No player has won both the #GreyCup MVP and Most Outstanding Canadian Awards previously. The MOC Award has been handed out since 1971.

#GreyCup trends to watch:
– The team with more Time of Possession has won 13 of the last 14 GC’s
– The team with a better 2nd down conversion % has won 8 of the last 10 and 19 of the last 23 GC’s
– Teams with the turnover advantage are 23-1 since 1988

Inactive players for today’s 107th Grey Cup presented by @Shaw_CFL
#Ticats REC #15 Marcus Tucker
#Bombers DB #22 Chandler Fenner

#GreyCup

Play #130 – All turnovers are automatically reviewed by the Command Centre. After review, it was determined by the Replay Official that the QB’s hand was moving forward with the ball, resulting in an incomplete pass. The ruling on the field is overturned. #GCPlayoffs

Play 56 – Winnipeg challenged the play believing that the Saskatchewan QB #7 (Fajardo) threw a forward pass from across the Line of Scrimmage. After review, the Replay Official determined there was no clear and obvious evidence that the QB’s back foot was beyond the LOS. (1/2)

Inactive players for today’s West Final:
#Riders REC Kenny Stafford
#Bombers DB Chandler Fenner

Trends to watch in the West Final:
– #Riders and #Bombers have met 14 times previously in the playoffs, series is split 7-7
– SSK is 5-0 after a bye week dating back to 2017
– Charleston Hughes led #CFL in sacks this season, Willie Jefferson led in pass knockdowns
#GCPlayoffs

That 26-yard reception takes #Ticats Brandon Banks to 100 receiving yards on the day, his first career 100+ receiving yard performance in the playoffs. Banks also has a receiving TD in all 3 games vs the #Esks this season. #GCPlayoffs

Play #114 – Edmonton challenged the play believing that their #82 (Ellingson) was interfered with by Hamilton #37 (Williams). After review, the Replay Official ruled there was contact by the Hamilton defender that materially impacted the receiver’s ability to play the ball. (1/2)

Play #10 – Hamilton challenged that Edmonton #29 (Walker) committed Defensive Pass Interference on their #86 (Addison). After review by the Replay Official, it was determined the defender made early contact on the receiver (1/2) #GCPlayoffs

Trends to watch in the East Final:
– 4 of the 7 teams to go undefeated at home lost a home Division Final, other 3 won Grey Cup
– When down at the half, #Ticats record was 4-1, #Esks were 1-9
– Both MLB’s (Larry Dean and Simoni Lawrence) are facing their former teams
#GCPlayoffs

Greg Quick will search the world for top football talent as the Canadian Football League’s very first Director, Global Scouting. twitter.com/CFL_PR/status/…

#Stampeders challenged that there was an Illegal Block Downfield by #Bombers #89 (Lawler) on their #8 (Amos). After review, the Replay Official ruled that there was no clear and obvious evidence that a foul had occurred. The ruling on the field stands. #GCPlayoffs

Play #31 – All turnovers are automatically reviewed by the Command Centre. After review, the Replay Official determined that there was no clear and obvious evidence that an incorrect call was made on the field. The ruling on the field stands. #GCPlayoffs

Inactive players for today’s West Semi-Final:

#Stampeders #38 Terry Williams
#Bombers #7 Lucky Whitehead

#GCPlayoffs

April 5, 2018

Official 2018 Combine results released

Combine measurements and testing results available for National Combine and all three Regional Combines.

In advance of the 2018 CFL Draft on May 3, the Canadian Football League (CFL) has released the National Combine and all three Regional Combine measurements and testing results.

Regional and National Combine testing results have been reviewed and confirmed. Media are encouraged to use the documents attached in advance and following the 2018 CFL Draft.

Combine Download
2018 National Combine Testing Results Download
2018 Western Regional Combine Testing Results Download
2018 Ontario Regional Combine Testing Results Download
2018 Eastern Regional Combine Testing Results  Download

 

March 22, 2018

Alteration to illegal contact challenge headlines proposed rule changes

Proposed Canadian Football League rule changes put an emphasis on player safety and improving the flow of the game.

WINNIPEG – Proposed Canadian Football League rule changes put an emphasis on player safety and improving the flow of the game.

The CFL’s Rules Committee is recommending changes on blindside blocks, expanding the definition of spearing, and eliminating low blocks by receivers, said Darren Hackwood, the CFL’s Senior Director of Officiating.

“Our Commissioner and our Board of Governors have clearly mandated us to focus on promoting and protecting the health of our players,” Hackwood said.

“The Rules Committee has responded by recommending that the board approve several measures that would broaden or clarify rules designed to improve safety for players.”

In addition, the Committee proposes that illegal contact on a receiver no longer be subject to coaches’ challenges.

To further improve game flow, it suggests the replay official automatically review “potential touchdowns” – plays when it appears obvious a touchdown has been scored but the play been marked down short of the goal line.


Analysis:  CFL tackles key illegal contact issue with new rule changes

CFL.ca senior writer Chris O’Leary speaks with senior director of officiating, Darren Hackwood, about the nuances of the recent proposed rule changes and how they could impact the flow of the game … READ MORE.


These changes address issues raised by fans in a number of forums, including Commissioner Randy Ambrosie’s recent town halls across the country.

Fans had expressed the view it was unfair to force a coach to use a challenge on what was an obvious touchdown and some had said challenges for illegal contact can slow down the game.

The Rules Committee, which includes several coaches and general managers as well as veteran official Al Bradbury and representatives of the Canadian Football Players Association, met in Winnipeg this week as part of Mark’s CFL Week. That’s the league’s off-season extravaganza that includes other football meetings and this weekend’s CFL Combine presented by adidas, as well as a Fan Fest, last night’s Canadian Football Hall of Fame VIP reception to announce the Class of 2018, and other events for CFL Fans and the media.

Here’s a closer look at some of the rule changes the Committee is asking the Board of Governors to approve before the upcoming season. It suggests the league:

• Make it illegal for any player to deliver a forcible block on an opponent while moving back towards his own goal line, sometimes referred to as “blindside” blocks.

• Outlaw low blocks that occur outside of the “tackle box”, an area that extends from tight end to tight end and from the quarterback or kicker to two yards beyond the line of scrimmage

• Widen the definition of spearing to include any situation where a player delivers a blow with his helmet as the initial or primary point of contact. This does not apply to a low running ball carrier.

• Eliminate a loophole in the “sleeper” play rule by making it illegal for a player who enters the game and remains outside the numbers to receive the ball in any manner including a kick or lateral.

• Simplify the rule on what constitutes a quarterback making a legal pass behind the line of scrimmage by defining it as the passer having at least one of his feet on or behind the line of scrimmage instead of requiring that the release point of the ball be behind the line of scrimmage.

• Eliminate the “force out” rule by requiring a receiver catching a ball to place at least one foot inbounds regardless of whether he was contacted in mid-air.

• Increase the penalty for “pyramiding” – the practice of using another player to elevate one’s self in an effort to block a kick — from five yards to ten yards to deter the behavior.

March 20, 2018

Canadian Football League pledges more than $3 million for amateur football in 2018

Member Clubs and the league building on the investment in tackle, touch and flag football in 2017.

The Canadian Football League (CFL) and its member clubs pledged to donate more than $3 million to amateur football this season, it was announced today.

“Football makes a world of difference to young people and we are committed to making a positive difference by supporting football,” said Randy Ambrosie, Commissioner of the CFL.

“The ultimate team sport, which provides a place for kids of all skills, body types and backgrounds, football teaches teamwork, discipline and perseverance. That’s why our teams provide funding, and our players and coaches give generously of their time, to support amateur football for many age groups and in many forms, including tackle, flag and touch football.”

The commitment made today builds on the effort CFL teams and the league office made in 2017 when they invested $3,352,000 in amateur football, according to a survey conducted by the CFL.

Players and coaches made more than 700 appearances at amateur football events, teams made direct donations and celebrated amateur football in their communities, and clinics and tournaments were organized across the country.

Here is just a sampling of a few of the programs and initiatives:

  • The Edmonton Eskimos donated their 50/50 draw earnings to support the development of amateur football in Northern Alberta. Recipients included Football Alberta, the Edmonton Wildcats, the Edmonton Huskies, University of Alberta Golden Bears Football and the Edmonton Eskimos Alumni Association’s amateur football initiatives.
  • The Saskatchewan Roughriders donated their 50/50 earnings from each game to the University of Regina Rams, University of Saskatchewan Huskies, Regina Thunder, Saskatoon Hilltops, Regina Riot, and the Saskatoon Valkyries as well as Football Saskatchewan. Additionally, the Riders sponsored youth flag football leagues in Regina, Saskatoon and Moose Jaw with both financial and in-kind donations.
  • The Ottawa REDBLACKS donated their 50/50 earnings last year to the National Capital Amateur Football Association.
  • The Montreal Alouettes donated to bursaries for the Foundation de l’athlete d’excellence du Quebec.
  • The Hamilton Tiger-Cats PlayAction program recognized local coaches and organizers and provided local athletes with the opportunity to attend clinics, camps and Tiger-Cat home games. Twenty-five individual Tiger-Cats players participated in the ever-popular High School Mentorship program, leading and mentoring high school football players at practices and games during the fall football season. The Tiger-Cats also launched their first ever Flag Football program for local elementary students at Tim Hortons Field last year once a week for the month of May.
  • The Winnipeg Blue Bombers supported both flag football and tackle football at all levels and ran free football programming for thousands of youth, in addition to providing multiple professional development and recognition opportunities for youth football coaches throughout the year.
  • The Calgary Stampeders donated their 50/50 funds to local and amateur football groups like the Calgary Colts, Bantams, U of C Dinos and high school football programs, along with flag football programs in Calgary junior high schools. The team also supported student athletes who are members of the University of Calgary Dinos football team through the John Forzani Endowment Fund.
  • The Toronto Argonauts hosted a Safe Contact Clinic where 150 amateur football coaches were certified in safe tackling and blocking techniques.
  • The BC Lions hosted the annual Orange Helmet Awards dinner in support of amateur football in their province.
  • The Canadian Football League launched the successful CFL NFL Flag football program which featured tournaments in all nine CFL cities, a national tournament at Grey Cup and a Canadian entry in an international competition at the Pro Bowl in Orlando.

“These programs and results speak to the power of the CFL to have a positive impact on amateur football and the young people who learn such valuable lessons from it,” Ambrosie said.

“Too often, the collective effort of our clubs and the league has been diminished by the fact we have not spoken with one voice. By conducting this survey of our amateur football efforts, we have uncovered the cumulative power of what we do. I have no doubt we will continue to build on this legacy and our sport and the young people it serves will both be better for it.”

March 19, 2018

A new CFL football for a new CFL season

A new ball features different leather but same laces and markings.

The Canadian Football League (CFL) is rolling out a new and improved ball for the upcoming 2018 season.

“We are currently delivering to our teams a ball that is slightly different from the one we’ve used in the past,” said Ryan Janzen, Senior Director of Football Operations for the CFL.

“The new ball is virtually identical, to the eye, to the old one. It has the same laces and markings including our stripes. But it is made of a slightly harder leather. Our partners at Wilson say that allows it to hold its pebbles better.”

The new ball may also be just a tiny fraction larger. It is the same length as the old one. But Wilson provides a range for what constitutes an acceptable circumference upon inflation and that could be up to an eighth of an inch larger for the new ball.

During 2017, CFL clubs were given the opportunity to test, at mini-camps and in training camp, the Wilson ball used in the NFL. Feedback from quarterbacks indicated they preferred the laces used on CFL balls but the leather of the NFL balls.

CFL General Managers subsequently proposed that the league adopt a new ball that has the laces, stripes and other markings of the old CFL ball but the leather and size of the NFL ball. The Board of Governors recently discussed the change at its winter meetings and the new balls were ordered.

“A new, improved and unique CFL ball has been created. And it is being delivered to our clubs now,” Janzen said.

March 15, 2018

A statement from the CFL on today’s Supreme Court Of Canada decision regarding the Bruce case

The Canadian Football League (CFL) has released the following statement: The CFL is very pleased with the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision.  We hope that this decision brings finality to any ...

The Canadian Football League (CFL) has released the following statement:

The CFL is very pleased with the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision.  We hope that this decision brings finality to any proceedings in the courts with respect to concussion litigation against the CFL.

March 12, 2018

Saskatchewan Roughrider Marcus Thigpen suspended for violating CFL/CFLPA drug policy

Thigpen suspension will come into effect once he is next eligible to play a regular season game.

Saskatchewan Roughriders running back Marcus Thigpen has been suspended for two-games after testing positive for a banned substance (Dehydrochloromethyltestosterone), under the drug policy of the Canadian Football League (CFL) and the Canadian Football League Players’ Association (CFLPA).

Players who test positive will face a two-game suspension for a first doping violation, a nine-game suspension for a second violation, a one-year suspension for a third violation, and a lifetime ban for a fourth violation.

Under the policy, a suspended player cannot participate in regular season or post-season games. It is up to the Club to determine whether that player can participate in other team activities, such as mini camp, training camp, practices and meetings. Thigpen will be eligible to take part in pre-season games.

All players will be subject to mandatory drug testing once testing positive and will participate in an assessment and clinical evaluation to determine if they need additional counselling.

The policy mandates a total number of random tests equal to 100% of the players in the CFL.

Random testing is ongoing and is conducted year-round.

March 7, 2018

A statement from the Canadian Football League on Euclid Cummings

The Canadian Football League (CFL) has released the following statement: “Upon learning of the criminal charges facing Euclid Cummings, CFL Commissioner Randy Ambrosie has voided his ...

The Canadian Football League (CFL) has released the following statement:

“Upon learning of the criminal charges facing Euclid Cummings, CFL Commissioner Randy Ambrosie has voided his contract with the BC Lions. As these charges are before the courts, the CFL will offer no further comment.”

February 20, 2018

CFL teams unveil ten players from their negotiation lists

This marks the first time teams unveil players on their negotiation lists.

The Canadian Football League (CFL) and the nine clubs have unveiled ten players from each team’s negotiation list.

Following the CFL winter meetings in Banff, AB the teams approved a measure to publicly share ten players from their negotiation list twice a year (February and December).

“Scouting potential CFL players, and managing negotiation lists, are just a few of the things our teams do around the clock in a never-ending effort to always get better,” said Randy Ambrosie, Commissioner of the Canadian Football League.

“The CFL is also constantly striving to improve. We need to do more to ensure our great league is featured in the conversation about sports and entertainment that is also happening around the clock today. Publicly releasing some of the names on our negotiation list is a step towards greater transparency. It gives the fans that support us and the media that cover us more CFL to talk about as we all look forward to our upcoming combines, draft and training camps.”

CFL by-laws state that teams can claim exclusive CFL rights to up to 45 players by placing them on their negotiation list. Players can be added, removed or traded from the list at any time.

Below are the lists of 10 players from each CFL team:

BC LIONS
Name Position College
Greg Ducre DB Washington
Ryan Finley QB NC State
Deondre Francois QB Florida State
Jake Fromm QB Georgia
Gage Gubrud QB Eastern Washington
Lamar Jackson QB Louisville
Najee Murray DB Kent State
Shea Patterson QB Michigan
Brett Rypien QB Boise State
Khalil Tate QB Arizona

 

EDMONTON ESKIMOS
Name Position College
Shane Buechele QB Texas
Case Cookus QB Northern Arizona
Will Davis DB Utah State
Josh James OL Carroll College
Phillip Lindsay RB Colorado
Jerry Louie-McGee WR/RET Montana
Steven Mitchell Jr. WR USC
Zack Wagenmann DE Montana
Manny Wilkins QB Arizona State
Shane Zylstra WR Minnesota State

 

CALGARY STAMPEDERS
Name Position College
Josh Allen OT Louisiana-Monroe
Keyarris Garrett WR Tulsa
Bennett Jackson DB Notre Dame
Anthony Johnson DT LSU
Tommylee Lewis WR Northern Illinois
Givens Price OT Nebraska
Tyler Rogers QB New Mexico State
Brandon Silvers QB Troy
Greg Ward Jr. QB/WR Houston
Tourek Williams DE Florida International

 

SASKATCHEWAN ROUGHRIDERS
Name Position College
Josh Boyce WR TCU
B.J. Daniels QB/RB South Florida
Akeem Davis LB Memphis
Curt Maggitt DE Tennessee
Trace McSorley QB Penn State
Luis Perez QB Texas A&M Commerce
Eric Pinkins DB San Diego State
Kevin Snead WR Carson-Newman
Daxton Swanson DB Sam Houston State
Adam Zaruba FB Simon Fraser

 

WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS
Name Position College
Jayson DiManche LB  Southern Illinois
Quinton Flowers QB South Florida
Alex McGough QB Florida International
Felix Menard-Briere K Montreal
Shakim Phillips WR Boston College
Cody Prewitt DB Ole Miss
Marcus Sayles DB West Georgia
Tharold Simon DB LSU
Chris Streveler QB South Dakota
Corey Washington REC Newberry College

 

HAMILTON TIGER-CATS
Name Position College
Randall Evans DB Kansas State
Robert Griffin III QB Baylor
DuJuan Harris RB Troy
Julian Howsare DE Clarion
McKenzie Milton QB Central Florida
Kalif Raymond WR Holy Cross
Jumal Rolle DB Catawba
Nathan Shepherd DL Fort Hays State
Tua Tagovailoa QB Alabama
Andrew Turzilli WR Rutgers

 

TORONTO ARGONAUTS
Name Position College
Houston Bates LB Louisiana Tech
Charles James DB Charleston Southern
Will Likely DB Maryland
Nico Marley LB Tulane
Keshawn Martin WR Michigan State
Baker Mayfield QB Oklahoma
Jonathan Meeks DB Clemson
Aaron Murray QB  Georgia
Denard Robinson RB/QB Michigan
Rodney Smith WR Florida State

 

OTTAWA REDBLACKS
Name Position College
Tyler Ferguson QB Western Kentucky
Bug Howard WR North Carolina
Joey Ivie DL Florida
Kaleb Johnson OL Rutgers
J.T. Jones DL Miami (Ohio)
Greg Little WR North Carolina
JoJo Natson WR Akron
Ejuan Price LB Pittsburgh
Phillip Walker QB Temple
Andrew Wylie OL Eastern Michigan

 

MONTREAL ALOUETTES
Name Position College
Woody Baron DL Virginia Tech
Brian Hill RB Wyoming
Colin Kaepernick QB Nevada
Devante Kincade QB Grambling State
Jonathan Krause WR Vanderbilt
Riley McCarron WR Iowa
Nick Moody LB Florida State
Anthony Philyaw RB Howard
Austin Rehkow K Idaho
Rico Richardson WR Jackson State

 

January 16, 2018

Saskatchewan Roughrider Bruce Campbell suspended for violating CFL/CFLPA drug policy

Campbell’s suspension will come into effect once he is next eligible to play a regular season game.

Saskatchewan Roughriders offensive lineman Bruce Campbell has been suspended for two games after testing positive for a banned substance (Ibutamoren), under the drug policy of the Canadian Football League (CFL) and the Canadian Football League Players’ Association (CFLPA).

Players who test positive will face a two-game suspension for a first doping violation, a nine-game suspension for a second violation, a one-year suspension for a third violation, and a lifetime ban for a fourth violation.

Under the policy, a suspended player cannot participate in games. It is up to the Club to determine whether that player can participate in other team activities, such as practices and meetings.

All players will be subject to mandatory drug testing once testing positive and will participate in an assessment and clinical evaluation to determine if they need additional counselling.

The policy mandates a total number of random tests equal to 100% of the players in the CFL.

Random testing is ongoing and is conducted year-round.

January 13, 2018

CFL wraps up winter conference on player health and safety

The prevention, assessment and management of concussions remains a major focus as the Canadian Football League (CFL) wraps up a two-day conference on player health and safety today. “Our team ...

The prevention, assessment and management of concussions remains a major focus as the Canadian Football League (CFL) wraps up a two-day conference on player health and safety today.

“Our team presidents and general managers devoted much of their winter meetings earlier this week to the topic of making our game as safe as it can be at all levels,” said Kevin McDonald, Vice-President, Football Operations and Player Safety for the CFL.

“That focus has continued into the weekend as team doctors, athletic therapists and representatives of the Canadian Football Players Association (CFLPA) joined league staff for two days devoted to this top priority.”

The conference’s agenda includes:

  • Evaluation of ongoing concussion research projects the league is participating in with an eye to understanding and incorporating emerging information.
  • An annual review of CFL Concussion protocols to ensure they remain world class.
  • An assessment of player education and awareness initiatives the league undertakes to encourage players to understand the signs and symptoms of concussions, the importance of reporting suspected concussions, and the type of play that can increase the risk of various types of injury.
  • A Review of the CFL’s Injury spotter program which places a person dedicated to injury monitoring in its Command Centre for every game.
  • A Review of processes for Injury Data Collection and extraction.
  • A review of the processes surrounding the CFL/CFLPA Drug Policy.
  • Updates on the latest information on helmet technologies.

“While this is our annual face-to-face meeting for team personnel at the forefront of our player healthy and safety efforts, the truth is we all are in constant contact and discussion throughout the year,” McDonald said.

“This work never ends and must always progress. We owe that to our tremendous players, devoted fans and great game.”

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