Play 177: The catch by CGY #4 (Rogers) was ruled out of bounds. The Command Centre determined there was no clear and obvious evidence to overturn the call. Call on the field stands. #CFLGameday

There has been two #CFL games this year to go to overtime and Montreal has played in both of them.

The other one took place in Week 8 against Ottawa. #CFLGameday

#Als WR DeVier Posey has set a career-high with 168 receiving yards and nine receptions tonight.

#CFLGameday

Play 128: Montreal challenged that CGY #81 (Klukas) did not catch the ball. The Command Centre determined that there was no clear and obvious evidence the receiver did not complete the catch before fumbling – call on the field stands.

#CFLGameday

With that 56-yard TD catch by #Stamps WR Reggie Begelton, it marks the first-time in his career he has multiple TDs in a game. #CFLGameday

#Als WR DeVier Posey has six receptions for 120 yards. Both are season-highs. #CFLGameday

With that interception by #Stamps DB Tre Roberson, he is now tied for first with Winston Rose with 6 interceptions this season. #CFLGameday

Play 14: Calgary challenged the penalty (illegal block downfield) called on CGY #4 (Rogers). The Command Centre confirmed that the block by CGY #4 on MTL #23 (Campbell) occurred before the pass was caught. The call on the field stands. #CFLGameday

Scratches in the #Als and #Stamps game:

MTL OL #55 Landon Rice
CGY DL #92 Vincent Desjardins

#CFLGameday

With 12 tackles in the game #REDBLACKS LB Avery Williams has set a new career-high. #CFLGameday

Global players in the #Alouettes and #Stamps game:

MTL OL #62 Diego Kuhlmann 🇲🇽
CGY WR #85 Andres Salgado 🇲🇽

@LFAmex #CFLGameday

#Ticats WR Bralon Addison surpassed the 100+ receiving yard mark in the game. It’s the third-time this season he has done this and fourth in his career. #CFLGameday

Play 120: Ottawa challenged that there was defensive pass interference on HAM #4 (Leonard) on OTT #15 (Rhymes). The Command Centre determined that there was no clear and obvious interference on the play, call stands.

Play 102: Ottawa challenged that there was no defensive pass interference on OTT #24 (Cioffi) on HAM #86 (Addison). The Command Centre determined there was no defensive pass interference on the play as HAM #86 stepped on OTT #24’s foot and then fell to the ground. #CFLGameday

Play 90: Hamilton challenged that there was pass interference by OTT #24 (Cioffi) on HAM receiver #16 (Banks). After review, the review official determined OTT#24 contacted the receiver (HAM #16) early and impeded the receiver’s play on the ball. #CFLGameday

Antoine Pruneau intercepts Dane Evans in the end zone. It’s Pruneau’s first interception of the season and ninth of his career. #CFLGameday

Entering week 10, #Alouettes QB Vernon Adams JR was 9th in the league in rushing yards #CFLGameday

RT @CFL_PR: Lewis Ward’s made field goal streak ends at 69. The streak is now 30 more than the next longest. #CFL https://t.co/3BOlRtQLXb

Global players playing in the #REDBLACKS and #Ticats game:

HAM #77 DL Valentin Gnahoua 🇫🇷
OTT #16 K Jose Maltos 🇲🇽

March 20, 2018

Canadian Football League pledges more than $3 million for amateur football in 2018

Member Clubs and the league building on the investment in tackle, touch and flag football in 2017.

The Canadian Football League (CFL) and its member clubs pledged to donate more than $3 million to amateur football this season, it was announced today.

“Football makes a world of difference to young people and we are committed to making a positive difference by supporting football,” said Randy Ambrosie, Commissioner of the CFL.

“The ultimate team sport, which provides a place for kids of all skills, body types and backgrounds, football teaches teamwork, discipline and perseverance. That’s why our teams provide funding, and our players and coaches give generously of their time, to support amateur football for many age groups and in many forms, including tackle, flag and touch football.”

The commitment made today builds on the effort CFL teams and the league office made in 2017 when they invested $3,352,000 in amateur football, according to a survey conducted by the CFL.

Players and coaches made more than 700 appearances at amateur football events, teams made direct donations and celebrated amateur football in their communities, and clinics and tournaments were organized across the country.

Here is just a sampling of a few of the programs and initiatives:

  • The Edmonton Eskimos donated their 50/50 draw earnings to support the development of amateur football in Northern Alberta. Recipients included Football Alberta, the Edmonton Wildcats, the Edmonton Huskies, University of Alberta Golden Bears Football and the Edmonton Eskimos Alumni Association’s amateur football initiatives.
  • The Saskatchewan Roughriders donated their 50/50 earnings from each game to the University of Regina Rams, University of Saskatchewan Huskies, Regina Thunder, Saskatoon Hilltops, Regina Riot, and the Saskatoon Valkyries as well as Football Saskatchewan. Additionally, the Riders sponsored youth flag football leagues in Regina, Saskatoon and Moose Jaw with both financial and in-kind donations.
  • The Ottawa REDBLACKS donated their 50/50 earnings last year to the National Capital Amateur Football Association.
  • The Montreal Alouettes donated to bursaries for the Foundation de l’athlete d’excellence du Quebec.
  • The Hamilton Tiger-Cats PlayAction program recognized local coaches and organizers and provided local athletes with the opportunity to attend clinics, camps and Tiger-Cat home games. Twenty-five individual Tiger-Cats players participated in the ever-popular High School Mentorship program, leading and mentoring high school football players at practices and games during the fall football season. The Tiger-Cats also launched their first ever Flag Football program for local elementary students at Tim Hortons Field last year once a week for the month of May.
  • The Winnipeg Blue Bombers supported both flag football and tackle football at all levels and ran free football programming for thousands of youth, in addition to providing multiple professional development and recognition opportunities for youth football coaches throughout the year.
  • The Calgary Stampeders donated their 50/50 funds to local and amateur football groups like the Calgary Colts, Bantams, U of C Dinos and high school football programs, along with flag football programs in Calgary junior high schools. The team also supported student athletes who are members of the University of Calgary Dinos football team through the John Forzani Endowment Fund.
  • The Toronto Argonauts hosted a Safe Contact Clinic where 150 amateur football coaches were certified in safe tackling and blocking techniques.
  • The BC Lions hosted the annual Orange Helmet Awards dinner in support of amateur football in their province.
  • The Canadian Football League launched the successful CFL NFL Flag football program which featured tournaments in all nine CFL cities, a national tournament at Grey Cup and a Canadian entry in an international competition at the Pro Bowl in Orlando.

“These programs and results speak to the power of the CFL to have a positive impact on amateur football and the young people who learn such valuable lessons from it,” Ambrosie said.

“Too often, the collective effort of our clubs and the league has been diminished by the fact we have not spoken with one voice. By conducting this survey of our amateur football efforts, we have uncovered the cumulative power of what we do. I have no doubt we will continue to build on this legacy and our sport and the young people it serves will both be better for it.”

March 19, 2018

A new CFL football for a new CFL season

New ball features different leather but same laces and markings.

The Canadian Football League (CFL) is rolling out a new and improved ball for the upcoming 2018 season.

“We are currently delivering to our teams a ball that is slightly different from the one we’ve used in the past,” said Ryan Janzen, Senior Director of Football Operations for the CFL.

“The new ball is virtually identical, to the eye, to the old one. It has the same laces and markings including our stripes. But it is made of a slightly harder leather. Our partners at Wilson say that allows it to hold its pebbles better.”

The new ball may also be just a tiny fraction larger. It is the same length as the old one. But Wilson provides a range for what constitutes an acceptable circumference upon inflation and that could be up to an eighth of an inch larger for the new ball.

During 2017, CFL clubs were given the opportunity to test, at mini-camps and in training camp, the Wilson ball used in the NFL. Feedback from quarterbacks indicated they preferred the laces used on CFL balls but the leather of the NFL balls.

CFL General Managers subsequently proposed that the league adopt a new ball that has the laces, stripes and other markings of the old CFL ball but the leather and size of the NFL ball. The Board of Governors recently discussed the change at its winter meetings and the new balls were ordered.

“A new, improved and unique CFL ball has been created. And it is being delivered to our clubs now,” Janzen said.

March 15, 2018

A statement from the CFL on today’s Supreme Court Of Canada decision regarding the Bruce case

The Canadian Football League (CFL) has released the following statement: The CFL is very pleased with the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision.  We hope that this decision brings finality to any ...

The Canadian Football League (CFL) has released the following statement:

The CFL is very pleased with the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision.  We hope that this decision brings finality to any proceedings in the courts with respect to concussion litigation against the CFL.

March 12, 2018

Saskatchewan Roughrider Marcus Thigpen suspended for violating CFL/CFLPA drug policy

Thigpen suspension will come into effect once he is next eligible to play a regular season game.

Saskatchewan Roughriders running back Marcus Thigpen has been suspended for two-games after testing positive for a banned substance (Dehydrochloromethyltestosterone), under the drug policy of the Canadian Football League (CFL) and the Canadian Football League Players’ Association (CFLPA).

Players who test positive will face a two-game suspension for a first doping violation, a nine-game suspension for a second violation, a one-year suspension for a third violation, and a lifetime ban for a fourth violation.

Under the policy, a suspended player cannot participate in regular season or post-season games. It is up to the Club to determine whether that player can participate in other team activities, such as mini camp, training camp, practices and meetings. Thigpen will be eligible to take part in pre-season games.

All players will be subject to mandatory drug testing once testing positive and will participate in an assessment and clinical evaluation to determine if they need additional counselling.

The policy mandates a total number of random tests equal to 100% of the players in the CFL.

Random testing is ongoing and is conducted year-round.

March 7, 2018

A statement from the Canadian Football League on Euclid Cummings

The Canadian Football League (CFL) has released the following statement: “Upon learning of the criminal charges facing Euclid Cummings, CFL Commissioner Randy Ambrosie has voided his ...

The Canadian Football League (CFL) has released the following statement:

“Upon learning of the criminal charges facing Euclid Cummings, CFL Commissioner Randy Ambrosie has voided his contract with the BC Lions. As these charges are before the courts, the CFL will offer no further comment.”

February 20, 2018

CFL teams unveil ten players from their negotiation lists

This marks the first time teams unveil players on their negotiation lists.

The Canadian Football League (CFL) and the nine clubs have unveiled ten players from each team’s negotiation list.

Following the CFL winter meetings in Banff, AB the teams approved a measure to publicly share ten players from their negotiation list twice a year (February and December).

“Scouting potential CFL players, and managing negotiation lists, are just a few of the things our teams do around the clock in a never-ending effort to always get better,” said Randy Ambrosie, Commissioner of the Canadian Football League.

“The CFL is also constantly striving to improve. We need to do more to ensure our great league is featured in the conversation about sports and entertainment that is also happening around the clock today. Publicly releasing some of the names on our negotiation list is a step towards greater transparency. It gives the fans that support us and the media that cover us more CFL to talk about as we all look forward to our upcoming combines, draft and training camps.”

CFL by-laws state that teams can claim exclusive CFL rights to up to 45 players by placing them on their negotiation list. Players can be added, removed or traded from the list at any time.

Below are the lists of 10 players from each CFL team:

BC LIONS
Name Position College
Greg Ducre DB Washington
Ryan Finley QB NC State
Deondre Francois QB Florida State
Jake Fromm QB Georgia
Gage Gubrud QB Eastern Washington
Lamar Jackson QB Louisville
Najee Murray DB Kent State
Shea Patterson QB Michigan
Brett Rypien QB Boise State
Khalil Tate QB Arizona

 

EDMONTON ESKIMOS
Name Position College
Shane Buechele QB Texas
Case Cookus QB Northern Arizona
Will Davis DB Utah State
Josh James OL Carroll College
Phillip Lindsay RB Colorado
Jerry Louie-McGee WR/RET Montana
Steven Mitchell Jr. WR USC
Zack Wagenmann DE Montana
Manny Wilkins QB Arizona State
Shane Zylstra WR Minnesota State

 

CALGARY STAMPEDERS
Name Position College
Josh Allen OT Louisiana-Monroe
Keyarris Garrett WR Tulsa
Bennett Jackson DB Notre Dame
Anthony Johnson DT LSU
Tommylee Lewis WR Northern Illinois
Givens Price OT Nebraska
Tyler Rogers QB New Mexico State
Brandon Silvers QB Troy
Greg Ward Jr. QB/WR Houston
Tourek Williams DE Florida International

 

SASKATCHEWAN ROUGHRIDERS
Name Position College
Josh Boyce WR TCU
B.J. Daniels QB/RB South Florida
Akeem Davis LB Memphis
Curt Maggitt DE Tennessee
Trace McSorley QB Penn State
Luis Perez QB Texas A&M Commerce
Eric Pinkins DB San Diego State
Kevin Snead WR Carson-Newman
Daxton Swanson DB Sam Houston State
Adam Zaruba FB Simon Fraser

 

WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS
Name Position College
Jayson DiManche LB  Southern Illinois
Quinton Flowers QB South Florida
Alex McGough QB Florida International
Felix Menard-Briere K Montreal
Shakim Phillips WR Boston College
Cody Prewitt DB Ole Miss
Marcus Sayles DB West Georgia
Tharold Simon DB LSU
Chris Streveler QB South Dakota
Corey Washington REC Newberry College

 

HAMILTON TIGER-CATS
Name Position College
Randall Evans DB Kansas State
Robert Griffin III QB Baylor
DuJuan Harris RB Troy
Julian Howsare DE Clarion
McKenzie Milton QB Central Florida
Kalif Raymond WR Holy Cross
Jumal Rolle DB Catawba
Nathan Shepherd DL Fort Hays State
Tua Tagovailoa QB Alabama
Andrew Turzilli WR Rutgers

 

TORONTO ARGONAUTS
Name Position College
Houston Bates LB Louisiana Tech
Charles James DB Charleston Southern
Will Likely DB Maryland
Nico Marley LB Tulane
Keshawn Martin WR Michigan State
Baker Mayfield QB Oklahoma
Jonathan Meeks DB Clemson
Aaron Murray QB  Georgia
Denard Robinson RB/QB Michigan
Rodney Smith WR Florida State

 

OTTAWA REDBLACKS
Name Position College
Tyler Ferguson QB Western Kentucky
Bug Howard WR North Carolina
Joey Ivie DL Florida
Kaleb Johnson OL Rutgers
J.T. Jones DL Miami (Ohio)
Greg Little WR North Carolina
JoJo Natson WR Akron
Ejuan Price LB Pittsburgh
Phillip Walker QB Temple
Andrew Wylie OL Eastern Michigan

 

MONTREAL ALOUETTES
Name Position College
Woody Baron DL Virginia Tech
Brian Hill RB Wyoming
Colin Kaepernick QB Nevada
Devante Kincade QB Grambling State
Jonathan Krause WR Vanderbilt
Riley McCarron WR Iowa
Nick Moody LB Florida State
Anthony Philyaw RB Howard
Austin Rehkow K Idaho
Rico Richardson WR Jackson State

 

January 16, 2018

Saskatchewan Roughrider Bruce Campbell suspended for violating CFL/CFLPA drug policy

Campbell’s suspension will come into effect once he is next eligible to play a regular season game.

Saskatchewan Roughriders offensive lineman Bruce Campbell has been suspended for two games after testing positive for a banned substance (Ibutamoren), under the drug policy of the Canadian Football League (CFL) and the Canadian Football League Players’ Association (CFLPA).

Players who test positive will face a two-game suspension for a first doping violation, a nine-game suspension for a second violation, a one-year suspension for a third violation, and a lifetime ban for a fourth violation.

Under the policy, a suspended player cannot participate in games. It is up to the Club to determine whether that player can participate in other team activities, such as practices and meetings.

All players will be subject to mandatory drug testing once testing positive and will participate in an assessment and clinical evaluation to determine if they need additional counselling.

The policy mandates a total number of random tests equal to 100% of the players in the CFL.

Random testing is ongoing and is conducted year-round.

January 13, 2018

CFL wraps up winter conference on player health and safety

The prevention, assessment and management of concussions remains a major focus as the Canadian Football League (CFL) wraps up a two-day conference on player health and safety today. “Our team ...

The prevention, assessment and management of concussions remains a major focus as the Canadian Football League (CFL) wraps up a two-day conference on player health and safety today.

“Our team presidents and general managers devoted much of their winter meetings earlier this week to the topic of making our game as safe as it can be at all levels,” said Kevin McDonald, Vice-President, Football Operations and Player Safety for the CFL.

“That focus has continued into the weekend as team doctors, athletic therapists and representatives of the Canadian Football Players Association (CFLPA) joined league staff for two days devoted to this top priority.”

The conference’s agenda includes:

  • Evaluation of ongoing concussion research projects the league is participating in with an eye to understanding and incorporating emerging information.
  • An annual review of CFL Concussion protocols to ensure they remain world class.
  • An assessment of player education and awareness initiatives the league undertakes to encourage players to understand the signs and symptoms of concussions, the importance of reporting suspected concussions, and the type of play that can increase the risk of various types of injury.
  • A Review of the CFL’s Injury spotter program which places a person dedicated to injury monitoring in its Command Centre for every game.
  • A Review of processes for Injury Data Collection and extraction.
  • A review of the processes surrounding the CFL/CFLPA Drug Policy.
  • Updates on the latest information on helmet technologies.

“While this is our annual face-to-face meeting for team personnel at the forefront of our player healthy and safety efforts, the truth is we all are in constant contact and discussion throughout the year,” McDonald said.

“This work never ends and must always progress. We owe that to our tremendous players, devoted fans and great game.”

March 22, 2017

Rules Committee recommends improvements to challenge process

The CFL Rules Committee has recommended improvements to the coaches challenge process, which will go to the Board of Governors for approval.

REGINA — The Canadian Football League’s rules committee is proposing changing some rules and procedures around coaches’ challenges to improve the flow of the game and improve the fan experience.

“These measures would, in some instances, speed up when a coach issues a challenge, alter what he can challenge, and ensure more video reviews occur during commercial timeouts instead of on top of them,” said Glen Johnson, senior vice-president of football for the CFL and chair of the league’s rules committee.

“Finding the right balance between using technology to help officiate the game and protecting the flow of the game is a challenge facing all sports and leagues including the CFL. We are tackling that challenge with the best possible fan experience, in stadium and on broadcast, as a top priority.”

Specifically, a coach would no longer be allowed to challenge a play following a TV commercial timeout.

If the change is approved, a coach would have to throw his challenge flag within the first 30 seconds of the TV break.

Currently, where there is a TV timeout on the field, a coach can wait the entire duration of a break before deciding to challenge, as long as he does so before the next snap. The result can be a two-minute commercial break followed by a 90 second challenge, hampering the flow of the game.

Jimmy Jeong/CFL.ca

The proposed rule changes will go before the CFL Board of Governors for approval (Jimmy Jeong/CFL.ca)

The committee is also suggesting limiting the types of actions challengeable under Roughing the Passer to the pure definition of Rule 7.2.4. on page 56 of the CFL Rulebook, which applies to when a quarterback is in the act of passing or potentially passing the ball, and when the quarterback slides feet-first across the line of scrimmage.

Other unnecessary roughness penalties that may occur against the passer behind the line of scrimmage, such as grabbing the facemask or horse collar tackles, would no longer be challengeable.

As well, actions that occur when the quarterback is across the line of scrimmage running with the ball, a quarterback sneak and dead ball fouls on the quarterback would no longer be challengeable.

The committee believes this will reduce the number of challenges while still ensuring the quarterback is protected when in the act of passing or potentially passing he ball, the original intent of making roughing the passer reviewable.

It is also recommending retaining a rule change made at midseason least year, which put a timeout at risk for every coach challenge that is incorrect. The committee is also proposing that the replay official only a change a call where there is clear and indisputable evidence that it is wrong, rather than attempt to officiate plays to ensure they are correct.

Members believe these two combined measures, in place for a full season, will discourage coaches from using their challenges, especially as they put timeouts at risk. They estimate this can reduce the number of challenges by 20% or more while still allowing coaches to challenge big plays that have a material impact on the game.

Finally, TSN will go to commercial on every challenge it can. It’s estimated that 80% of challenges will now be done during a commercial, up from 20% last season. That will significantly reduce unnecessary stoppages in the game and improve the fan experience both in stadium and on broadcast.

The committee has also recommended increasing the duties of the video official in the Command Centre so they can correct errors when:

  • When a flag has been thrown for a line of scrimmage penalty (offside or procedure)
  • When a flag has been thrown for an unnecessary roughness penalty following a play and the video official sees other unnecessary roughness infractions
  • When a call for illegal contact on a receiver should be changed to defensive pass interference because the ball had been thrown

 

To further promote player safety, the committee wants to change all 10-yard illegal low block penalties to 15-yard unnecessary roughness penalties. The committee recognized the importance of signaling that such dangerous blocks have no place in the game.

The committee wants to prevent the return team on a kicking play from putting a player on the field a split second prior to the snap and trying to hide him so he can receive a lateral pass from the kick returner.

This sort of “sleeper play” would be subject to a 10-yard penalty.

All rules committee recommendations must be reviewed by the league’s competition committee and ultimately approved by its Board of Governors before they go into effect.

The rules committee includes representatives from every club, the Canadian Football League Players’ Association, the Canadian Professional Football Officials’ Association and the CFL.

August 26, 2016

CFL approves rule change on coaches’ challenges

The Canadian Football League has approved a rule change on coaches’ challenges, as an unsuccessful first challenge will now cost a team a time out

TORONTO – The Canadian Football League has approved a rule change on coaches’ challenges.

Effective immediately, if a team makes its first coach’s challenge of the game and does not win that challenge, the team will now lose a timeout. If the team wins its challenge, it will keep its timeout.

In other words, the first coach’s challenge is no longer a “free” one. With this change in place, teams now put a timeout at risk with their first challenge, in the same way they already do for their second challenge of the game. And teams must be in possession of a timeout to make a challenge. Teams are allowed two timeouts per game and can only use one timeout in the last three minutes of the game.

“We are listening to our fans,” said Jeffrey L. Orridge, commissioner of the CFL. “And while it’s unusual to have a rule change during the season, the league and our teams wanted to respond to fans’ concerns about the frequency of challenges.

“We are proud of the innovation we have brought to our game, including innovation in the use of replay, and the fact that these advances are being followed by other leagues. But innovation in any pursuit is often followed by adjustments and alterations. Fan enjoyment is vitally important.”

The league reviews its rules and procedures each off season, and intends to take a further look then at the issue of replay and challenges, said Glen Johnson, senior vice-president, football.

“Our leadership believes this change is a step in the right direction, as our game continues to evolve in an era of technology,” he said.

This rule change was unanimously approved Thursday by the league’s governors following a recommendation from its rules committee.

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